Early Years (FD) and Physical Difficulties

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Learning Support (FD) and Physical Difficulties

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Education Studies and Physical Difficulties

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Sociology and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Sociology and Students with Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities.

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

History and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


History and Students with Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities.

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

General Business and Management and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities.

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Manufacturing Management (FD) and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities.

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

International Foundation Diploma and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities.

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Psychology and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities.

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Biosciences and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities.

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

 

Geography and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities.

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

For further details concerning geography and students with mobility impairmants see Milsom, C., Anwar, N. and Thompson, S. (2006), Developing an Inclusive Curriculum for Students with Mobility Impairments. The Geography Disciplines Network (GDN) Inclusive Curriculum Project (ICP) Guidelines, HEFCE Project, University of Gloucestershire, (accessed November 2006).

 

Physical Disabilities

Challenges and Subjects – this link takes you to challenges and subjects associated with this disability.


Brief description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Characteristics Impacting on Learning and Teaching

Access

The initial barrier experienced by many students with physical disabilities is physically accessing the learning environment itself. For many the inaccessibility of buildings is a problem, so there are important questions to ask: Can students get into the building? Can they get around when in it? Is there somewhere for students to rest or take breaks? Is the student able to reach the teaching and learning materials?

Perceptual Difficulties

Students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties, and these can take different forms. Some students have difficulty actually receiving information by seeing or hearing, while others can see or hear but cannot process the information they receive. This can cause difficulties with reading and writing, for example in locating the correct place on the page, or moving from left to right when reading or writing.

Speech/Communication Difficulties

Students with a neurological impairment, who stammer or have other speech and language difficulties, along with students who are deaf or who have partial hearing, may all have difficulty communicating through speech.

People with communication difficulties are often thought to be far less able than they really are. It is important to check personal responses to ensure there are no automatic assumptions being made concerning a student’s intelligence and ability if their speech is very slow or slurred. The potential of these students often goes unrecognised.

Memory Difficulties

Memory difficulties may be a major issue faced by students who have acquired brain injury. Responses will need to relate directly and explicitly to individual learning goals, programmes of study and contexts. Early guidance should be given in relation to alternative ways of learning.

Students with short-term memory difficulties may find it very hard to remember instructions. Some students may have fluctuating memories, being able to complete a task in one session, but be unable to do it in another, making it difficult to record progress. Memory also affects students’ ability to sequence. Some students with long-term memory difficulties may not learn even after many repetitions and much practice, and appear to ‘start again’ each time. It is important to remember that memory difficulties do not correlate with a student’s intelligence.

Physical Disabilities

For further information on physical disabilities, please see the following external links and references:

If you would like to recommend any links to be added to this page please email s.smith@worc.ac.uk


Back Care http://www.backcare.org.uk/index-second-level.php

British Epilepsy Association http://www.epilepsy.org.uk/

British Heart Foundation http://www.bhf.org.uk/

British Institute for Brain Injured Children http://www.bibic.org.uk/

British Lung Foundation http://www.lunguk.org/

British Polio Society http://www.britishpolio.org.uk/

Brittle Bone Society http://www.brittlebone.org/

Down’s Syndrome Association http://www.downs-syndrome.org.uk/

Haemophilia Association http://www.haemophilia.org.uk/

International Glaucoma Association http://www.glaucoma-association.com/nqcontent.cfm?a_id=176&=fromcfc&tt=arti

Jennifer Trust for Spinal Muscular Atrophy http://www.jtsma.org.uk/

Limbless Association http://www.limbless-association.org/

National Head Injury Association http://www.headway.org.uk/

The Migraine Trust http://www.migrainetrust.org/

Multiple Sclerosis Society http://www.mssociety.org.uk/

Raynauds and Scleroderma Association http://www.raynauds.org.uk/flash_content.html

Reach http://www.reach.org.uk/

The Scoliosis Association http://www.sauk.org.uk/

The Sickle Cell Society http://www.sicklecellsociety.org/

SCOPE http://www.scope.org.uk/

Spinal Injuries Association http://www.spinal.co.uk/

The Stroke Association http://www.stroke.org.uk/

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Veterinary Science and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Veterinary Science and Students with Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Students with a wide range of disabilities or health conditions can achieve the required standards of knowledge and skills to enable them to practise as veterinary surgeons, but it needs to be recognised that each case is different and has to be viewed on its individual merits. The safety of patients, the public and other colleagues must always take priority.

Absence or Partial Loss of a Limb

On its own, loss or partial loss of a limb would not necessarily preclude an individual from consideration for admission. The effects of the individual’s disability with reference to the RCVS competencies should be considered. In particular, the individual’s ability to handle and restrain animals safely, and to handle equipment will need to be considered.

Wheelchair Users

An individual who is permanently based in a wheelchair would be unable to demonstrate the full range of RCVS competencies, and would not therefore be able to graduate with the registerable veterinary degree.

 

Computing and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Dance, Drama and Performance and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Consulting most modern dictionaries, the definition of the verb to dance appears almost surprisingly innocuous; to move the body and feet in rhythm, ordinarily to music, to move lightly and gaily, to bob up and down, or to be stirred into rapid movement, like leaves in the wind. Most of these phrases capture the innocent and essential aspect of a particular state of motion which is typically associated with a positive emotional mode and shared across the human species. However, these definitions hardly reveal the multitude of social functions associated with dance.

Even in our modern Western world where dance has lost much of its ancient ritualistic power and its official status, dance is nevertheless an essential, ubiquitous part of human togetherness and thereby can be a carrier of social values as well as a means to regulate social structure and heirarchy. This broad impact of dance is of course associated with the fact that dance is at once an established art form and a very generic form of social interaction. These aspects mark the ends of the broad and amazingly colourful spectrum of dance. Despite the apparent gap between dance as social activity and as a performing art, there is ample connection and exchange and that is why the emergence of disabled dancers is an important phenomenon.

Information taken from: Schmitz, Uli. (1998). Article Written for the 1998 Internet Conference on Art & Disability. National Arts and Disability Center, UCLA. http://www.axisdance.org/education/uli_essay.html

 

English and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Mathematics, Statistics and Operational Research and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities.

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Music and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

 

Nursing and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Disabled student nurses can face difficulties gaining employment, especially those with visible or obvious disabilities, because employers often find it difficult to look beyond the disability and focus on what the employee can contribute to the workplace. Historically the medical model of disability implies that a person needs to be ‘healed’ and employers can think of the person as needing to be taken care of or requiring an intervention rather than as a healthy person, with a disability, who is a competent health care professional. The question often asked is whether a disabled nurse can provide safe and competent care. The other question often raised is how the employer can ensure safety in the workplace when working with a disabled nurse.

There are numerous adjustments that can be made within a workplace for student nurses with physical disabilities. For example, the student may need to use an assistant to help with lifting or similar manual/physical tasks. Students may also need to take more regular breaks and/or work flexible hours to accommodate times when their stamina may be reduced. Students may need to use specialist equipment or reposition existing equipment to enable them to access it effectively.

Adjustments should be easily made if students are trained to work effectively in teams. Asking for assistance is all part of the teamwork that is essential for any nurse’s survival in a busy, fast-paced workplace. All students will have strengths and weaknesses to bring to the team, regardless of whether they have a disability or not and effectively managing their weaker areas, by asking colleagues to double-check things demonstrates effective team working.

Nurses with physical disabilities may have unique skills that they can bring to the team. Student nurses with physical disabilities may have a personal insight into what it is like to be ill and to be hospitalised, and therefore may be able to develop a special rapport with patients if patients are able to recognise that their carer empathises with them.

 

Physiotherapy and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Disabled physiotherapy students may face difficulties gaining employment, especially those with visible or obvious disabilities, because employers often find it difficult to look beyond the disability and focus on what the employee can contribute to the workplace. Historically the medical model of disability implies that a person needs to be healed and employers can think of the person as needing to be taken care of or requiring an intervention rather than as a healthy person, with a disability, who is a competent health care professional. The question often asked is whether a disabled physiotherapist can provide safe and competent care. The other question often raised is how the employer can ensure safety in the workplace when working with a disabled colleague.

There are numerous adjustments that can be made within a workplace for students with physical disabilities. For example, the student may need to use an assistant to help with lifting or similar manual/physical tasks. Students may also need to take more regular breaks and/or work flexible hours to accommodate times when their stamina may be reduced. Students may need to use specialist equipment or reposition existing equipment to enable them to access it effectively.

Adjustments should be easily made if students are trained to work effectively in teams. Asking for assistance is all part of the teamwork that is essential for survival in any busy, fast-paced workplace. All students will have strengths and weaknesses to bring to the team, regardless of whether they have a disability or not and effectively managing their weaker areas, by asking colleagues to double-check things demonstrates effective team working.

Physiotherapists with physical disabilities may have unique skills that they can bring to the team, for example they may have a personal insight into what it is like to live with a physical impairment or experience extreme physical pain. They may therefore be better equipped to develop a special rapport with patients if patients are able to recognise that their carer empathises with them.

Preparing for a Clinical Placement

Issues surrounding support for students with physical disabilities are wide ranging and will depend very much on individual requirements.

When considering mobility in the workplace, it may be advisable for the student to visit the clinical setting before the placement begins to meet appropriate staff and to begin familiarisation with the environment.

It also may be necessary for Clinical Educators to provide a slightly longer induction process to enable the student to successfully negotiate his/her surroundings (this will of course depend on the complexity of the setting and the abilities of the student).

The following issues are ones that Clinical Educators may need to consider:

  • Physical access to the workplace itself and navigation around the premises. If the student is not familiar with the route and the premises, it may be useful for the Clinical Education Co-ordinator and/or the Clinical Educator to suggest a strategy of prior ‘route familiarisation’ with the student.
  • If working in outpatients it may be useful, but not essential, for the student to have a specific cubicle for his/her own use.
  • In the inpatient situation, if patients are spread over a number of wards, it may be advisable to ask the student to concentrate on one or two of those wards as long as this does not reduce the quality of his/her clinical experience.
  • Availability and type of public transport especially if the placement is in the Community.
  • Availability of accessible parking spaces.
  • Modification of treatment techniques possibly including the help of a Personal Assistant.
  • Flexible working practices.

It is useful for both the students and the Clinical Educators to give these matters some thought so that discussion can take place enabling negotiation of mutually acceptable arrangements.

 

Social Work and Physical Disabilities

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief Description of Physical Disabilities including Neurological Disabilities

Physical disabilities affecting students can take many different forms. They can be temporary or permanent, fluctuating, stable or degenerative, and may affect parts of the body or the whole of it. Some students with physical disabilities, neurological conditions or acquired brain injury may have perceptual difficulties. Students may have experienced barriers to learning that relate to negative perceptions of their disability and low expectations. They may also have missed out on vital stages of learning during their schooling, affecting language acquisition and the development of literacy.

Disabled students can face difficulties gaining employment, especially those with visible or obvious disabilities, because employers often find it difficult to look beyond the disability and focus on what the employee can contribute to the workplace. Historically the medical model of disability implies that a person needs to be healed and employers can think of the person as needing to be taken care of or requiring an intervention rather than as a healthy person, with a disability, who is a competent social worker. The question often asked is whether a disabled social worker can provide safe and competent care. The other question often raised is how the employer can ensure safety in the workplace when working with a disabled colleague.

There are numerous adjustments that can be made within a workplace for students with physical disabilities. For example, the student may need to use an assistant to help with lifting or similar manual/physical tasks. Students may also need to take more regular breaks and/or work flexible hours to accommodate times when their stamina may be reduced. Students may need to use specialist equipment or reposition existing equipment to enable them to access it effectively.

Adjustments should be easily made if students are trained to work effectively in teams. Asking for assistance is all part of the teamwork that is essential for survival in any busy, fast-paced workplace. All students will have strengths and weaknesses to bring to the team, regardless of whether they have a disability or not and effectively managing their weaker areas, by asking colleagues to double-check things demonstrates effective team working.

Social workers with physical disabilities may have unique skills that they can bring to the team, for example having a personal insight into what it is like to live with a physical disability and/or constant physical pain. They may therefore be better equipped to develop a special rapport with clients if clients are able to recognise that their carer empathises with them.