Early Years (FD) and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Early Years and Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot do the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the student environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module / course or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the students has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of achieving student goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.

Learning Support (FD) and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Learning Support and Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot do the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the student environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module / course or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the students has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of achieving student goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.

Education Studies and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Education Studies and Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot do the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the student environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module / course or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the students has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of achieving student goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.

Psychology and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Psychology and Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot do the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the student environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module / course or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the students has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of achieving student goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.

Sociology and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Sociology and Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot do the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the student environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module / course or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the students has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of achieving student goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.

History and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

History and Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot do the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the student environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module / course or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the students has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of achieving student goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.

General Business and Management and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

General Business and Management and Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot do the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the learning environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module/course, or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the student has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of helping students achieve their goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.

Manufacturing Management (FD) and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Manufacturing Management and Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot do the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the learning environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module/course, or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the student has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of helping students achieve their goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.

International Foundation Diploma and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

International Foundation Diploma and Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot do the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the student environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module / course or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the students has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of achieving student goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.

Biosciences and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Biosciences and Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot do the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the student environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module / course or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the students has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of achieving student goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.

Geography and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Geography and Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks such as solving complicated problems, yet cannot do the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn rather than as a disability.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the student environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module / course or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the students has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of achieving student goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.
For further details concerning geography and students with dyslexia see Waterfield, J., West, B. and Chalkley, B. (2006), Developing an Inclusive Curriculum for Students with Dyslexia and Hidden Disabilities. The Geography Disciplines Network (GDN) Inclusive Curriculum Project (ICP) Guidelines, HEFCE Project, University of Gloucestershire, http://www2.glos.ac.uk/gdn/icp/idyslexia.pdf (accessed November 2006).
 

Dyslexia

Challenges and Subjects – this link takes you to challenges and subjects associated with dyslexia.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Detailed description of Dyslexia

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot do the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Students with dyslexia can possess the following strengths:

  • Creative and original thinking.
  • Good strategic thinking and problem-solving.
  • Determined and hard-working.
  • Highly motivated.
  • Many have developed their own strategies to overcome some of their difficulties.

Because of their language processing and short-term memory difficulties, dyslexic students rely heavily on meaning and understanding, which requires:

  • A highly personalised approach to learning,
  • A need to have the learning process and conventions made explicit,
  • A need to understand how and why in order to learn.

Many, but not necessarily all, of the following learning styles could apply to dyslexic students:

  • Thinking holistically (all at once) rather than step by step.
  • Needing to see the whole ‘picture’ first before learning the steps or details.
  • Difficulty remembering sequences but not patterns.
  • Good at seeing how lots of things are connected, how things work.
  • Difficulty memorising things except when something is really understood or there is a personal connection.
  • Learning by experience, not from being told.
  • Concrete tactile learning and learning better with the help of colour, humour, stories, images, etc.
  • Difficulty learning or applying rules or generalisations – learning from the particular to the general.
  • Finding it easier to read and write if there is a personal interest in the subject matter.
  • In mathematics, often understand concepts but not calculation processes or mathematical language.

Characteristics Impacting on Teaching and Learning

Reading

Reading forms a major part of most curricular activities and if a student has, for instance, half the reading speed of other students, this may put an immense strain on their studies, affecting their ability to remember what has been read. Vocabulary levels may also be poor and so comprehension suffers. Students with dyslexia may experience any or all of the following:

  • Visual stress.
  • Reading overload.
  • Lack of speed with reading.
  • Difficulty summarising.
  • Difficulty sorting and selecting materials for study.
  • A lack of understanding and retention of what has been read.
  • Difficulty extracting the main points from what has been read.
  • Misreading (assignment or examination questions).
Spelling

Dyslexic students can experience problems with written expression and vocabulary to the point where it affects a tutor’s understanding of their work.

Note-taking

The difficulties experienced by some students with dyslexia might include some or all of the following:

  • Difficulty writing and listening simultaneously.
  • Difficulty making detailed notes and understanding what has been written when reading it back.
  • Difficulty extracting the main points during lectures.

Problems copying quickly and correctly.

Writing

Students with dyslexia may experience problems with their written work including some or all of the following:

  • Poorly constructed and slow handwriting interfering with their ability to get ideas down.
  • Difficulty planning and structuring written work.
  • Problems with the transition of ideas.
  • Difficulty relating theory to practice.
  • Poor written expression and/or sentence structure.
  • Difficulty understanding conventions in writing.
  • Difficulty relating abstract to particular.

Problems editing and proof-reading.

Oral Language

Certain difficulties, experienced by students with dyslexia, can be associated with language as well as written work and reading.

Students may experience problems taking in information given orally quickly or accurately enough, misunderstanding instructions or information, assimilating what has been said in a group situation, word-finding problems or with pronunciation of polysyllabic words.

Organisational Skills/Time Management

Some dyslexic students experience short-term memory problems which can affect note-taking, reading, writing and organisation but can also make it difficult to organise their time and meet deadlines.

These difficulties tend to be the ones that are most often ignored and, because of this, dyslexic students can sometimes be judged as being lazy, unmotivated, sloppy or careless.

Calculation

Many students with dyslexia are mathematically very able; however, some may have difficulties resulting from visual perceptual or short-term/working memory problems. Dyslexic students may also experience some or all of the following mathematical difficulties:

  • Visual problems such as reversals and substitutions.
  • Transcription errors between media.
  • Losing place in multi-step calculations or failing to hold all aspects in mind.
  • Difficulty remembering sign and symbols.
  • Problems remembering formulae and theorems.
  • Difficulty retrieving specialised vocabulary.
  • Difficulty with arithmetic and basic numeracy.
  • Difficulty moving from concrete to abstract.

 

Nursing and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Many students with dyslexia may lack confidence in the clinical setting due to fear of discrimination and/or because of previous negative experiences. The effect of this can be reduced if staff members who are aware of students’ issues are accepting and non-judgemental. Providing encouragement and support helps to establish an atmosphere of trust and safety. Patience is essential and removing, or at least not placing undue emphasis on time pressures, can relive stress.

Not all students with dyslexia have the same pattern of strengths and difficulties. It may be helpful, to identify the specific requirements of the individual student prior to placement. A simple checklist could be produced to identify these requirements which may be used to facilitate discussion of support strategies with the Clinical Educator.

If the student already has a regular Dyslexia Support Tutor, it may be useful to have a three-way meeting prior to or at the beginning of the placement. This can be used to establish the exact requirements of the clinical setting and how best the student can be supported. If the Dyslexia Support Tutor is included at this stage, the student can keep in contact throughout the placement for ongoing support.

Arrange an orientation process including the use of a map. A tutor or clinician could walk the student(s) through the environment, identifying significant places and people and their roles/functions. The student should be given the opportunity to practice entering number codes on doors as some people find it easier to remember the tactile pattern rather than the number alone.

Many students describe the experience of feeling that they have to constantly flag up issues with Clinical Educators and often feel that this is perceived as being a nuisance. This problem can be circumvented if contact names are provided for the students with times when those people are available to talk about issues specific to dyslexia.

The following strategies may be helpful for students who find reading and writing tasks difficult and/or tiring:

  • Give the student clear guidelines for specific record keeping formats and if necessary provide help with planning and structure.
  • Provide some proof reading for patient records.
  • Offer good examples of previously written patient notes.

The following strategies may be helpful to help with the overall management and organisation of the clinical placement:

  • Enquire of students on first contact whether they have any support needs, so indicating an open and non-judgmental approach within the department.
  • Construct timetables to assist organisation – encourage students to be actively involved in this process by noting down their priorities for the shift at the beginning of the shift.
  • Encourage students to keep a diary or notebook for forward planning and reflection (this could be recorded using audio-visual equipment).
  • Allow more time for students to write up patient notes, students may need to have their notes checked before committing them to charts.
  • Consider flexible working patterns that enable students to work at their most efficient level e.g. allowing notes to be written at intervals during the day rather than expecting them all to be written up at the end of the day.
  • Be sympathetic to students using Dictaphones or mini-disks to record key points during patient assessment.
  • Allow students to use proforma sheets or to take brief crib notes when performing patient assessments.
  • Where possible encourage students to use computers to write up notes. This will improve spelling and grammar due to the inbuilt software features.
  • If appropriate allow the student to use a palmtop or tablet computer for note keeping.
  • Avoid overloading students’ study time.
  • Encourage peer support and group working if there is more than one student working in the clinical area.
  • Students may need to have their skills observed during the initial stages of the placement in order to ensure safe and confident practice before meeting patients.

Overall, there are a number of areas where adjustments may need to be implemented or the approach may need to be modified in order to enable full participation in clinical placements. These should be discussed and negotiated by the student and Clinical Educator, and any specific adjustments should be recorded and signed by all parties.

 

Physiotherapy and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Physiotherapy and Students with Dyslexia

Many students with dyslexia may lack confidence in the clinical setting due to fear of discrimination and/or because of previous negative experiences. The effect of this can be reduced if staff members who are aware of students’ issues are accepting and non-judgemental. Providing encouragement and support helps to establish an atmosphere of trust and safety. Patience is essential and removing, or at least not placing undue emphasis on time pressures, can relive stress.

Not all students with dyslexia have the same pattern of strengths and difficulties. It may be helpful, to identify the specific requirements of the individual student prior to placement. A simple checklist could be produced to identify these requirements which may be used to facilitate discussion of support strategies with the Clinical Educator.

If the student already has a regular Dyslexia Support Tutor, it may be useful to have a three-way meeting prior to or at the beginning of the placement. This can be used to establish the exact requirements of the clinical setting and how best the student can be supported. If the Dyslexia Support Tutor is included at this stage, the student can keep in contact throughout the placement for ongoing support.

Arrange an orientation process including the use of a map. A tutor or clinician could walk the student(s) through the environment, identifying significant places and people and their roles/functions. The student should be given the opportunity to practice entering number codes on doors as some people find it easier to remember the tactile pattern rather than the number alone.

Many students describe the experience of feeling that they have to constantly flag up issues with Clinical Educators and often feel that this is perceived as being ‘a nuisance’. This problem can be circumvented if contact names are provided for the students with times when those people are available to talk about issues specific to dyslexia.

The following strategies may be helpful for students who find reading and writing tasks difficult and/or tiring:

  • If students are expected to undertake a large amount of reading prior to and during a clinical placement, Clinical Educators should identify the key/essential material.
  • Give the student clear guidelines for specific record keeping formats and if necessary provide help with planning and structure.
  • Provide some proof reading for patient records.
  • Offer good examples of previously written patient notes.

The following strategies may be helpful to help with the overall management and organisation of the clinical placement:

  • Enquire of students on first contact whether they have any support needs, so indicating an open and non-judgmental approach within the department.
  • Construct timetables to assist organisation – encourage students to be actively involved in this process.
  • Encourage students to keep a diary for forward planning and reflection (this could be recorded using audio-visual equipment).
  • Allow more time for students to write up patient notes.
  • Consider flexible working patterns that enable students to work at their most efficient level e.g. allowing notes to be written at intervals during the day rather than expecting them all to be written up at the end of the day.
  • Be sympathetic to students using Dictaphones or mini-disks to record key points during patient assessment.
  • Allow students to use proforma sheets or to take brief crib notes when performing patient assessments.
  • Where possible encourage students to use computers to write up notes. This will improve spelling and grammar due to the inbuilt software features.
  • If appropriate allow the student to use a palmtop or tablet computer for note keeping.
  • Avoid overloading students’ study time.
  • Encourage peer support and group working if there is more than one student working in the clinical area.

Overall, there are a number of areas where adjustments may need to be implemented or the approach may need to be modified in order to enable full participation in clinical placements. These should be discussed and negotiated by the student and Clinical Educator, and any specific adjustments should be recorded and signed by all parties.

 

Social Work and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Social Work and Students with Dyslexia

Although there are some variations, general approaches to teaching and learning in qualifying training for social work have tended to reflect some fairly strong patterns which have become more or less well established over the years. Thus campus based teaching on DipSW programmes has shown a fairly heavy reliance principally on lectures, seminars, workshop activities, small group discussions, and private study as some of the main vehicles for the educational process. All of these approaches have traditionally relied to a considerable extent on the written word through the use of e.g. handouts, overhead projector slides, black/white boards, flip-charts, note-taking, written task briefings, library work (mostly books and papers) etc.

Similarly the assessment of campus based learning has remained firmly rooted in pen and paper methods, as most summative assessment takes the form of a written assignment of some description. This obviously disadvantages those students who have difficulty with the written word, and educational institutions have been slow to develop alternative forms of teaching and assessment which are less reliant on this form of communication. In the very recent past there has been an increasing effort to make learning technology available to students with special needs, and this has been of considerable assistance to many such students in that it can help to improve significantly the quality of their written work. Nevertheless the requirement to produce this written work in itself places on students with dyslexia a burden that is additional to those placed on other students.

Work Placements

Typically, workplacements have centred (whatever the setting or placement context) on a workload comprising a problem situation(s) or task(s) which the student requires to address under the supervision of the practice teacher. Practice teachers vary in the methods they use, but most build their supervision round periodic discussion sessions during which the student is encouraged and facilitated to explore and make decisions about a wide range of issues and questions pertinent to her/his workload and development. The extent to which this is dependent on use of written materials ranges from some settings (many of which are in the voluntary sector) where written records are kept to a minimum, to others (typically in the local authority sector) where written records are a fundamental communication medium throughout the organisation and are often, indeed, a statutory requirement.

Over and above agency recordings, many practice teachers require students to use other forms of writing to assist the learning process. Process recordings are perhaps not used as widely as they once were, but some practice teachers still see them, or a variation of them, as an effective basis for exploration of some aspects of the student’s work that can otherwise be difficult to reach. Reflective diaries or learning logs (or, again, some variation of these) have increasingly been used in recent years as a means of locating particular levels of the student’s thinking and feeling.

Whatever the general approach adopted by the practice teacher or the agency, however, assessment of practice invariably depends heavily on written material. This occurs mainly in two ways. First of all, students will be assessed on, among other things, their ability to produce written materials of a particular quality and within a given range of forms. Difficulty in doing so tends to be seen as a competence deficit. Secondly, they will require to produce a written report at the end of their placement, and this report is increasingly viewed as direct evidence on which are based judgements about a range of other competences. It is in some respects ironic that at a time when understanding of the needs and problems of students who have dyslexia is beginning to develop, the effects of CCETSW’s Rules and Requirements for the DipSW (1995) in respect of the assessment of practice is to place greater, rather than less, emphasis on written material produced by the student as a basis for assessment decisions.

Having said that, there is one very important point that requires to be emphasised. In order to gain a professional qualification in social work, any student must demonstrate that s/he has met the requirements of the DipSW programme in terms of values, knowledge and competence. There is no suggestion in this Guide that students with dyslexia should in some way be exempt from any of these requirements, nor that the standards demanded of them at the point of qualification should be any different from those that apply generally. This principle applies to written communication as much as to any other area of competence.

The difference between students who have dyslexia and others is the means by which they develop towards demonstration of that competence. This Guide is primarily about how such students can be helped, encouraged and supported to develop the skills they will need, and the task comes under two broad headings:

  • The development, by the student, of strategies that s/he can employ in working towards and demonstrating the necessary competences, including those in written communication.
  • The development, by those with responsibility for supporting the student’s learning, of strategies for engaging with her/his learning styles and patterns in order that the individual student’s learning is maximised.

If success is achieved in these two areas, then the student should complete the professional training programme with the skills required for qualified practice.

Specific styles and patterns of learning

What then are the particular problems that face social work students who have dyslexia? If such students find it difficult to use the principal media on which formal social work education has historically been based, through what other means can they learn? These are fundamentally important questions, and to address them we need to consider the particular patterns and styles of learning that people with dyslexia tend to use more readily, more comfortably and (therefore) more effectively.

It is important to recognise that we all use a mixture of learning styles which varies from one person to another to suit the specific needs, history and orientations of the individual. They also vary for any individual according to the particular kind of task we may be tackling and perhaps also to some degree according to the circumstances we are in at any given time. Despite these variations however, we will each tend to be more comfortable with and proficient in some strategies as opposed to others, and in part our preferences will reflect our psychological make-up. Work in this field by e.g. Kolb (1984) and Honey & Mumford (1986) is widely known, and suggests a range of learning styles in the general population, varying in pattern from one individual to another.

If as we have seen there are identifiable psychological features that tend to characterise dyslexia, then clearly these will have implications for the natural learning patterns of those who are affected. People with dyslexia will draw on the same range of learning patterns and styles that are available to us all but, as with us all, they will rely more heavily on some that on others. Some of the patterns which tend to be most useful to and most effectively used by students who have dyslexia include the following:

  • Multisensory learning: that is, learning through a variety of senses simultaneously. Most of us would find it easier and more effective to learn to swim or to drive a car by being instructed while actually in the pool or the vehicle, as we could then use a range of senses – hearing, seeing (including watching others), touch, our kinaesthetic sense, etc. – to reinforce each other. For most of us, such an approach would be more effective than simply being instructed verbally by another person in a classroom or office, or trying to follow written instructions. For students who have dyslexia, the contrast between these two types of approach is especially marked, because a multisensory approach helps them by being less reliant on words alone; by bypassing the difficulties they can have in organising new material conceptually; and by using their naturally more holistic approach to learning.
  • Over-learning: "practice makes perfect". To use the same examples, proficiency in swimming or driving is greatly enhanced by constant repetition of the same procedures until they become well established in one’s repertoire of skills. Students who have dyslexia are no different from others in this respect, except that (especially in verbal or sequencing tasks) they need to use this particular pattern of learning much more extensively than many of the rest of us because of their short-term memory difficulties. This is one of the reasons that learning requires much more hard work, concentration and effort from a student with dyslexia than from most others.
  • Structured learning: that is, learning where the student can locate the detail of what s/he is trying to understand within a wider picture. Because the right-brain strengths of a student with dyslexia tend to produce a more holistic approach to learning, s/he will understand new information more readily if it can be set within a clear context that highlights how different elements relate together.
  • Progression in learning: an approach to learning that builds up skills and knowledge gradually and in a progressive sequence will exploit such student’s holistic approach, whereas one which does not build in this way is more likely to confuse the student because s/he will find it difficult to understand the learning as part of a sequential process.
  • Using shortcuts and aids to learning: we all try to simplify difficult tasks, e.g. by using a calculator rather than carrying out complex numerical calculations by mental arithmetic. However, students who have dyslexia may need to use different aids to learning from most of the rest of us, because of their particular learning patterns. Spelling aids are an obvious example, but others like mnemonics, diagrams, mind maps, visual patterns, colour codes, etc. may be especially valuable and more readily understandable to a dyslexic student.
  • Self-aware learning: all adults learn more effectively if they are in charge of how they learn, and this is especially true for people with dyslexia. Part of the reason for this is that their patterns of learning may be seen as unusual and therefore others may not consider these patterns to be as legitimate as the more conventional ones. Thus many people with dyslexia are pushed to learn in ways that feel alien to them, and this is not only much less effective in itself but its effectiveness also tends to be further reduced because such an approach can present a serious threat to their confidence. Given that many with dyslexia are already far from being confident learners (as a result of their earlier educational and social experience) the negative impact from this further threat on their self-esteem and educational achievement can be considerable. If however they are encouraged to learn by the means which s/he sees as potentially the most effective, s/he will benefit partly because the means thus selected is more likely to be the most appropriate, since they are much more likely to understand their own learning patterns than will someone who does not have dyslexia. Additionally however, the increased confidence that can result from such an approach will itself enhance the effectiveness of the learning.

This issue of confidence and self-esteem is of critical significance for people with dyslexia, and its relevance for their educational development cannot be emphasised enough. Despite the fact that some of the particular strengths and capabilities that come with dyslexia are now beginning to be acknowledged, it is extremely rare to find an adult with dyslexia whose self-esteem has not been adversely affected (in some cases severely) by negative experiences stretching back to childhood. One result of this is that their confidence as learners is very much more fragile than in the general population, and so they are particularly vulnerable to setbacks or to unsympathetic or ill-judged approaches in their educational environment. For them, more than for most, explicit recognition, encouragement and support of their educational achievement relate directly to the degree of success in their efforts.

Information taken from Campbell, J.W.S. and Cowe, T. (1998) Working with DipSW Students with Dyslexia: A Guide for Practice Teachers. University of Strathclyde. To access the full report click the following link http://www.wofscon.com/publications/word_docs/Dyslexia_Guide.doc.

 

Veterinary Science and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Veterinary Science and Students with Dyslexia

Students with a wide range of disabilities or health conditions can achieve the required standards of knowledge and skills to enable them to practise as veterinary surgeons, but it needs to be recognised that each case is different and has to be viewed on its individual merits. The safety of patients, the public and other colleagues must always take priority.

Veterinary schools in the UK already have vast experience of admitting students with disabilities, of which dyslexia is the most common. Whilst most students are able to cope with some degree of dyslexia, it can present particular difficulties for veterinary students who must be able to manage a heavy reading load to keep up with the academic standards of the course. It may be advisable before an offer is made to a student with dyslexia to refer the student to the university’s Disability Officer or other independent dyslexia specialist to determine the level and degree of dyslexia. Assessment reports that are more than two years old should not be used as the basis on which to make a decision as an individual’s characteristics may change over time. Students with dyslexia who are admitted to the course may need additional support from the university’s special needs specialists. By the end of the course, however, students will need to be able to demonstrate that they are able to practise unaided.

As far as written course work and examinations are concerned, whilst some allowance can be made for dyslexia by allowing extra time, or the use of a computer, in written examination, this should not be such as to give the student an unfair advantage over others, or to prevent the assessment of the student’s ability to cope with written material, which is an essential part of the job. The veterinary surgeon – often working alone – must be able to read and prepare written reports, handle complex data, and prepare and dispense accurate prescriptions, all of which, however, could be computer generated under certain circumstances. Scribes should only be permitted for temporary disability such as a broken arm, not for someone who would never be able to produce the required level of work, either by computer or by hand. If a student’s dyslexia is so severe that it prevents them demonstrating these skills without assistance from a third party, this could ultimately endanger the safety of patients.

Advice from the Royal Veterinary College states that: Students with a very severe level of dyslexia would have great difficulty in coping with the demands of the registerable veterinary degree. Advice should be taken from the appropriate dyslexia specialists or educational psychologists.

 

Computing and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Computing and Students with Dyslexia

When considering the impact that dyslexia might have on a student’s ability to learning computer programming, it is important not to focus too heavily on any negative aspects this might have for learning, and instead think of dyslexia as an alternative learning style. This moves the perception of dyslexia from that of a disability to that of a different. It is possible that dyslexic students may be stronger at:

  • Visualization.
  • Spatial awareness.
  • Creativity.
  • Lateral thinking.

Whilst this does not in any way take away from the difficulties dyslexic students may have faced throughout their education, these may be abilities that are advantageous in particular situations, compensating for some difficulties. When considering how the task of software design may be affected by the feature of dyslexia, it is useful to break down the activity into a serious of sub-tasks that are required to write a computer program, e.g.:

  • Recognition of a need.
  • Problem definition.
  • Synthesis – conceiving what is require of the whole program, class, method, at different levels of abstraction.
  • Analysis – what individual classes, methods or code will be required to create the whole functionality, again at different levels of abstraction.
  • Implementation – coding, testing and correction until the program both compiles and functions in the expected manner.
  • Evaluation – involves user trialing of the program and may engender further refinements or even a re-conceptualisation of the program.

The generation of a computer program and its subsequent correcting and testing requires a great many logical and organisational skills combined with a precise expression of syntax and variable names. The general design and problem-solving tasks involved in programming require the skills that may be strong in dyslexic programmers. This may also be true of synthesis, looking at the program as a whole and how the elements interact seems a holistic activity; and people with dyslexia tend to think holistically. However, the skills required in analysis, breaking down the problem or system into its component parts and viewing them in a systematic logical sequence are processes that people with dyslexia may tend to find more difficult. Further, the more specific programming tasks, especially those associated with generating and correcting computer code, are more adversely affected by the negative features of dyslexia. For example misspelling variable names and syntax terms are obviously detrimental to the process of programming. In addition, remembering the minutiae of details involved in the program, such as the name and purpose of variables declared, what changes have been implemented to the code and what has yet to be implemented, places a considerable load on the short term memory, and hence could prove to be additionally taxing to a programmer with dyslexia. Similarly, keeping track of the developing structure of the program and what stage in the implementation has been reached, also ensuring items are implemented at an appropriate time; all seem to require organisational skills that may put a programmer with dyslexia at a disadvantage. Finally, the systematic testing and evaluation of the product requires organisational skills in its planning and execution in addition to the additional burden imposed on the short term memory of tracking down the cause of any unintended behaviour of the system.

Information taken from: Powell, N. et al. (2003). Dyslexia and Learning Computer Programming. Leeds Metropolitan University. For access to the full article click the following link http://www.ics.ltsn.ac.uk/pub/italics/Vol3-2/dyslexia.htm

 

Dance, Drama and Performance and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Dance, Drama and Performance and Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot to the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the student environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module / course or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the students has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of achieving student goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.

 

English and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

English and Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot to the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the student environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module / course or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the students has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of achieving student goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.

 

Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Hospitality, Leisure, Sport & Tourism and Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot to the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the student environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module / course or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the students has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of achieving student goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.

Mathematics, Statistics and Operational Research and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

MSOR and Students with Dyslexia

Many students with dyslexia are mathematically very able, however, some may have difficulties resulting from visual perceptual or short-term / working memory problems, such students often choose to study mathematics, physics or engineering, avoiding subject areas containing high language content.

However, some students with SpLDs have additional problems with mathematics, these may include algebraic difficulties and moving from concrete numerical situations to the more abstract.

Students, who are both dyslexic and dyscalculic, will experience similar problems to dyslexic students, but also have fundamental difficulties with basic numeracy.

Dyscalculic students will have deficits in their basic numerical skills and an impaired sense of number size, which will affect their understanding of number concepts and relationships.

Specific difficulties experienced by dyslexic students undertaking mathematical courses or modules may include some or all of the following:

  • Visual problems such as reversals and substitutions – provide material in hard copy so that students can check back.
  • Transcription errors between media – provide solution sheets that allow students to check their errors.
  • Losing place in multi-step calculations or failing to hold all aspects in mind – provide examples and exemplar solutions or consider using different colours for each aspect of a calculation.
  • Difficulty remembering sign and symbols – provide clear definitions of new symbols, provide concrete examples of their use and give the symbol and the word definition together.
  • Problems remembering formulae and theorems – encourage the use of a card index or card-carry case and emphasise which have to be learnt.
  • Difficulty retrieving specialised vocabulary – provide clear definitions, provide concrete examples of their use and highlight these key words.
  • Difficulties with arithmetic and basic numeracy – allow the use of calculators.
  • Difficulty moving from concrete to abstract – try to give both numerical and theoretical examples.

(Taken from J.Szumko, ELSU: Mathematics section by C.Trott, MLSC: Feb 2004)

Music and Dyslexia

Challenges – this link takes you to more specific challenges associated with learning.


Brief description of Dyslexia

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Dyslexia affects the area of the brain that deals with language, leading to differences in the way information is processed and affecting the underlying skills needed for learning to read, write and spell.

Dyslexic students can often perform a range of complex tasks, such as solving complicated problems in electronics or design, yet cannot to the seemingly simple: learning to read and spell, organising writing, taking notes, remembering instructions, telling the time or finding their way around. A way of regarding this pattern of strengths and weaknesses is as a cognitive or learning style, in fact many dyslexic students themselves experience their dyslexia as a difference in the way they think or learn.

Many students with dyslexia have learnt to adopt certain strategies to help them cope with day to day life within the student environment. However, there are certain times when adoption of these strategies becomes difficult and the student may experience adverse effects as a result. For example, during times of transition (e.g. exams and assessments, change of module / course or changes in the student’s personal life), learning new application procedures, during periods of extreme time pressure and/or when students lack the necessary understanding to complete a task. It may be that the students has been demonstrating a high level of competence up to the point of transition and suddenly starts to lack confidence or suffer from stress and anxiety. It is important to be aware of this and look out for the signs that suggest a student may not be coping as well as they might.

It is during times of difficulty that it may be necessary for tutors to consider alternative ways of achieving student goals. It is wrong to assume that all students will want to approach their studies in the same way and a certain amount of flexibility may need to be adopted. Some of the following strategies may be useful to bear in mind in order to generate a supportive, inclusive learning environment for all students:

  • Develop your own understanding of dyslexia and talk to your student about how it affects them personally and what they understand about their own preferred learning style.
  • Ensure that all students have access to any information you provide by ensuring it is in an accessible format.
  • Identify any specific issues within the learning environment and identify and promote alternative ways of sharing and accessing information e.g. by using verbal communication instead of written.
  • Try to develop an atmosphere of support amongst all students.
  • Take steps to build the confidence of students so that if any students do want to disclose their dyslexia, they can be sure they will be supported and understood.