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Frequently Asked Questions

Who is this site for?

It is primarily designed for teachers and trainers in higher education and post-16 vocational education and training, and anyone concerned with course planning, assessment and quality assurance.  It also contains a lot of useful information for students/potential students at all levels and educational support workers.

Do I need to register or pay to use the site?

No, the site is completely free and there is no requirement to register.  However, we would be very pleased to hear from you, so please click the feedback icon after you have used the site and let us have your opinions and suggestions for improvements.

Where should I start?

We recommend you click on the Browse icon   in the left-hand ‘Quick Links’ menu (above the FAQs icon ).
On the next screen you can choose to browse in one of the following 4 ways:
  • by Subject
  • by Disability
  • by Subject and Disability together
  • by Learning Activity

Do I need to have specialist knowledge about disability to use the site? 

No, absolutely not.  The site is designed to provide advice for teachers and trainers in mainstream institutions to help them ensure that the courses they teach are accessible for disabled people.

Is this site complete or can I suggest some further ideas?

The site will never be regarded as complete.  We hope to keep expanding it to cover many more subjects, and to continually improve the advice available.  We would certainly welcome any suggestions you may have. 
Please click on the Feedback icon in the left-hand ‘Quick Links’ menu to let us know your opinions of the site and give us new ideas.

Can I benefit from the site if my subject isn’t listed?

Yes, you certainly can. You can find plenty of useful information by selecting particular disabilities and reading the descriptions, associated teaching strategies and potential challenges.  You may also be able to find a similar subject and Browse by this subject together with particular disabilities.  Additionally, you can Browse by ‘Learning Activities’ and get some brief advice concerning Small Groups including seminars and tutorials, Large Groups and Lectures, Laboratory Work.

What if I have no disabled students on my course?

The site is just as useful to you, if not more so, since you may have less experience of including disabled students.  Disabilities are not necessarily obvious, and many students do not declare their disability for a variety of reasons, so you may not know if you have any disabled students on your course. Also, you may not have any disabled students on your course now, but what about next semester?  It is part of European-wide law that people with disabilities should not be discriminated against, and that education should be available to all in mainstream institutions wherever possible.  So you need to know how to include all potential students. 

How do I find out about particular disabilities and their effects?

From the ‘Welcome to SCIPS’ page, click on the Browse icon  in the left-hand ‘Quick Links’ menu.  On the next screen, click on arrow to the right of the ‘Disability’ select box to get pull-down menu.  Select the particular disability required and click on the Browse button to its right.  If you cannot find the particular disability you are looking for, you can click the ‘Search’ icon in the ‘Quick Links’ menu and key in the particular name of the disability, or you can try one of the more general disability areas listed (Medical Conditions or Physical Disabilities).  This leads to a brief description of the disability followed by a further description, then associated teaching strategies and potential challenges.

How do I find out how to teach my subject to students with a particular disability or a variety of disabilities?

From the ‘Welcome to SCIPS’ page, click on the Browse icon  in the left-hand ‘Quick Links’ menu.  On the next screen, click on arrow to the right of the ‘Subject’ select box to get pull-down menu.  Select your subject or the one most similar if your subject is not listed.  Click on arrow to the right of the ‘Disability’ select box to get another pull-down menu.  Select a particular disability area, then click on the Browse button to the right.  This will give you a brief description of the selected disability and associated teaching strategies and potential challenges.  You can go back and select other disability areas for other associated teaching strategies.

How do I know if a student has dyslexia? 

From the ‘Welcome to SCIPS’ page, click on the Browse icon  in the left-hand ‘Quick Links’ menu.  On the next screen, click on arrow to the right of the ‘Disability’ select box to get pull-down menu.  Select ‘Dyslexia’ and click on the Browse button to its right.  This leads to a brief description and further description of Dyslexia followed by associated teaching strategies and potential challenges.  At the end of this section there are further resources listed.

Can I find any examples of students with specific disabilities?

From the ‘Welcome to SCIPS’ page, click on the Browse icon in the left-hand ‘Quick Links’ menu.  On the next screen, click on arrow to the right of the ‘Subject’ select box to get pull-down menu.  Select a subject, then click on arrow to the right of the ‘Disability’ select box to get  another pull-down menu.  Select the specific disability area you are interested in and click on the Browse button to its right.  On the next screen, under the left-hand ‘Quick Links’ box is another box labelled ‘Case Studies’.  Scroll down until you find a relevant example.  There are currently only a limited number of case studies, so it is possible you will not find one for the particular subject/disability you are looking for.

How do I cope with teaching disabled students in a laboratory?

From the ‘Welcome to SCIPS’ page, click on the Browse icon  in the left-hand ‘Quick Links’ menu.  On the next screen, click on arrow to the right of the ‘Learning Activity’ select box to get pull-down menu.  Select ‘Laboratory Work’.  This gives some brief advice.  You may also select a suitable subject and disability from the ‘Subject’ and ‘Disabilities’ drop-down menus.  If you click on the Browse button to the right of the ‘Disabilities’ drop-down menu, this leads to descriptions of the chosen disability, then associated teaching strategies.  This will include strategies for laboratory work, where appropriate.

Some Specific Questions

How do I get advice about how to teach students with memory problems caused by a brain injury?

From the ‘Welcome to SCIPS’ page, click on the Browse icon  in the left-hand ‘Quick Links’ menu.  On the next screen, click on arrow to the right of the ‘Disability’ select box to get pull-down menu.  Select ‘Physical Disabilities’ and click on the Browse button to its right.  This leads to a brief description and further description of Physical Disabilities, followed by associated teaching strategies and potential challenges.  You will see that this includes Neurological Disabilities.  Or you can click on the Search icon in the left-hand ‘Quick Links’ menu and key in ‘memory problems’ or ‘brain injury’.

How do I find out how best to teach a student who uses a wheelchair?

From the ‘Welcome to SCIPS’ page, click on the Browse icon  in the left-hand ‘Quick Links’ menu.  On the next screen, click on arrow to the right of the ‘Disability’ select box to get pull-down menu.  Select ‘Physical Disabilities’ and click on the Browse button to its right.  This leads to a brief description and further description of Physical Disabilities, followed by associated teaching strategies and potential challenges.  One of the potential challenges listed is ‘mobility difficulties’.  Click on this to access further information.  Alternatively, you can click on the Search icon in the left-hand ‘Quick Links’ menu and key in ‘wheelchair’.

Where can I get advice about teaching students with epilepsy or severe asthma?

From the ‘Welcome to SCIPS’ page, click on the Browse icon  in the left-hand ‘Quick Links’ menu.  On the next screen, click on arrow to the right of the ‘Disability’ select box to get pull-down menu.  Select ‘Medical Conditions’ and click on the Browse button to its right.  This leads to a brief description and further description of Medical Conditions.  Both epilepsy and asthma are included.  This leads to associated teaching strategies and potential challenges, some of which will be relevant to epilepsy or asthma.  Alternatively, you can click on the Search icon in the left-hand ‘Quick Links’ menu and key in ‘epilepsy’ or ‘asthma’.

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